The Myths

Popular myths


 

 

The planning decision could still be over-turned.

 

Permission was granted in August 2016. Prior to this the planning department spent many months meticulously scrutinising and consulting stakeholders prior to making a recomendation for approval. The decision was then passed to the borough planning comittee who debated the proposal prior to visiting the site and then at a further meeting passing the application on a 9-4 vote.

The period allowed to lodge a legal challenge against the planning decision has now passed.

 

 

 

We already produce enough chickens...

 

Every week we import 5.5 million chickens from places such as Asia and Brazil.

 

A poultry farm will cause a regular 'stink' up to 6 miles away...

 

This would mean that every poultry farm would blight an area the size of Birmingham. There are 2,500 poultry farms currently operating in the UK. Whilst there have been some issues with much older units, a recent independent BBC investigation could not detect any smell just 30 metres down wind from a modern poultry farm. There is no evidence that the 40 poultry barns already operating close to this part of Norfolk are causing significant problems.

 

The roads around the site will be overcrowded by heavy lorries....

 

Having studied the proposal and an independent report commisioned by local residents, Norfolk County Council concluded in January 2016 that traffic movements are in fact quite low and will not have a detrimental effect on the local community.  Average daily traffic movements are assessed at just under 3 per day. An average takes account of busier and quieter times. An independent report commissioned by the No Poultry Farming  group in December 2015 estimated an average of less than 2 daily traffic movements. This conclusion did not take into account a reduction in existing traffic movements due to less biosolids/fertiliser being delivered to the main agricultural business.

 

Poultry farms could poison local water courses...

 

Potentially this is true. Therefore poultry farms are regulated with frequent inspecions by the Environment Agency to prevent this. As an additional measure all poultry farms have to collect and store some of their waste water and later dispose of it safely off-site.

 

Poultry farms are very noisy...

 

Day to day operations are less noisy than an arable farm especially if a grain dryer is operating on the site. Modern ventilation fans do not produce high-levels of noise and so you would not hear them unless you were physically standing quite close to the actual poultry barns whilst they were operating.

 

British chickens are reared by indiscriminately using antibiotics...

 

Using antibiotics as a growth stimulant is banned in the UK. Antibiotics have to be prescribed by a vet and chickens cannot enter the food chain until 28 days after they have been prescribed medicines. Whilst these standards have also been adopted in countries such as Brazil, India and parts of Asia, there is major concerns that these regulations are not being as strictly enforced as they are in the UK.

 

In 2014 an investigation in India found that 80% of a sample from several farms may have received severely inappropriate antibiotic treatments. There is a strong argument that to safeguard antibiotics for the future we should be reducing our reliance on these less regulated overseas producers.

 

"Increasing scientific evidence suggests that the clinical issues with antimicrobial resistance that we face in human medicine are primarily the result of antibiotic use in people, rather than the use of antibiotics in animals"

Prof Dame Sally Davies, Chief Medical Officer - Antimicrobial Resistance Strategy 2013-18

 

There are known health risks to properties near poultry farms...

 

There is no compelling scientific advice that prevents residential properties being built close to or even within a chicken farm. Indeed most chicken farms are located either immediately adjacent to a farm house or have residential properties for the site staff. Many chicken farms operate within a 1/4 to 1/2 a mile from local villages. 

 

It is possible to find negative information about the health implications of living close to livestock units on the internet. This should be balanced with significantly more reports on the internet about the dangers of having pets in your home, living in close proximity to wifi equipment and drinking tap water. 

 

Poultry farms in the UK should be built on brown field sites...

 

Poultry farming is made sustainable by the benefits of taking minor areas of lower grade agricultural land out of production. The price of land on brown field sites would mean that the farms would not be viable.


 

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